javbank

Will Alcoholics Ever Be Able to Return to Moderate Drinking?

logiciel de trading option

operare con azioni binarie

الفوركس على الإنترنت

köp Viagra på nätet Kalmar moderate drinkingApril is Alcohol Awareness Month

Tadalafil Oral Strips USA Buy I’ll just have one drink—but no more than two: That is an easy goal to set while you are sober. However, what happens after that second drink?[1] Can your sober intentions hold up to the desire for a third, or have the first two drinks wrecked your willpower?1 These questions are the foundation of a major debate in addiction research and treatment: Can people who are addicted to alcohol recover and return to addiction-free, moderate drinking?1

24option con recensioni For years, the answer was a solid “No.”1 However, traditional programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous are being influenced by modern research to create new and improved strategies of addiction treatment.1 Everything is being questioned, as researchers further discover what does and doesn’t work.1 The psychiatric community is now reexamining the truths that were once thought to be absolute.1

http://www.swazilandforum.com/?n=www-stockpair-com www stockpair com Therefore, does absolute abstinence still exist as scientifically accurate, or does the “moderate management” approach to drinking have a place in modern addiction care?1 Well, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer.1 In fact, it comes down to what kind of drinker the individual is: why do they drink, how much do they drink, and how long have they been set in this pattern?1 The longer a person is in an aggressive drinking pattern, the more the alcohol changes the physical characteristics of the brain.1

opzioni binarie le scommesse finanziarie di hamish raw Problem drinkers may still be purely motivated by emotion, association, or coping with alcohol’s desirable effects.1 If their drinking is purely of a cognitive cause, there is evidence that they may be non-dependent problem drinkers.1 These people may be able to retreat from addiction back to moderate drinking.1

http://blog.pinkprincess.com/?svecha=tradelg-codici-binari&68e=89 tradelg codici binari However, others may not be able to make the retreat.1 When problem drinking becomes an addiction, cognitive causes are no longer the only reasons to drink.1 Long-term alcohol dependence creates changes to the physiology of the brain, resulting in memory loss and even stunting of the brain’s ability to grow new neurons.1 Over time, the brain loses its ability to produce and use dopamine.1 Addicted, it isn’t just one or two drinks the brain wants.1

binära optioner låtsaspengar Therefore, as there is a huge difference between the brain of a non-dependent problem drinker and the brain of a person addicted to alcohol, there is a huge difference between who can retreat back to moderate drinking, and who cannot.1 For those addicted to alcohol, the only real option remains to be abstinence.1



Viagra cialis billig [1] Scharff, C., & Taite, R. (2014, April 8). Can Alcoholics Ever Drink Moderately?. binäre optionen insider tipps Psychology Today. Retrieved April 10, 2014, from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ending-addiction-good/201404/can-alcoholics-ever-drink-moderately

binär optionen news

yasal ikili opsiyon şirketleri April is Alcohol Awareness Month

I’ll just have one drink—but no more than two: That is an easy goal to set while you are sober. However, what happens after that second drink?[1] Can your sober intentions hold up to the desire for a third, or have the first two drinks wrecked your willpower?1 These questions are the foundation of a major debate in addiction research and treatment: Can people who are addicted to alcohol recover and return to addiction-free moderate drinking?1

For years, the answer was a solid “No.”1 However, traditional programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous are being influenced by modern research to create new and improved strategies of addiction treatment.1 Everything is being questioned, as researchers further discover what does and doesn’t work.1 The psychiatric community is now reexamining the truths that were once thought to be absolute.1

Therefore, does absolute abstinence still exist as scientifically accurate, or does the “moderate management” approach to drinking have a place in modern addiction care?1 Well, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer.1 In fact, it comes down to what kind of drinker the individual is: why do they drink, how much do they drink, and how long have they been set in this pattern?1 The longer a person is in an aggressive drinking pattern, the more the alcohol changes the physical characteristics of the brain.1

Problem drinkers may still be purely motivated by emotion, association, or coping with alcohol’s desirable effects.1 If their drinking is purely of a cognitive cause, there is evidence that they may be non-dependent problem drinkers.1 These people may be able to retreat from addiction back to moderate drinking.1

However, others may not be able to make the retreat.1 When problem drinking becomes an addiction, cognitive causes are no longer the only reasons to drink.1 Long-term alcohol dependence creates changes to the physiology of the brain, resulting in memory loss and even stunting of the brain’s ability to grow new neurons.1 Over time, the brain loses its ability to produce and use dopamine.1 Addicted, it isn’t just one or two drinks the brain wants.1

Therefore, as there is a huge difference between the brain of a non-dependent problem drinker and the brain of a person addicted to alcohol, there is a huge difference between who can retreat back to moderate drinking, and who cannot.1 For those addicted to alcohol, the only real option remains to be abstinence.1


[1] Scharff, C., & Taite, R. (2014, April 8). Can Alcoholics Ever Drink Moderately?. opcje binarne zarabiaj Psychology Today. Retrieved April 10, 2014, from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ending-addiction-good/201404/can-alcoholics-ever-drink-moderately

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

We are the only facility in Florida owned and operated by an addiction psychiatrist involved in all treatment decisions. Learn more
Hello. Add your message here.